Eddie Garcia of the Orange County Vector Control District

Orange County Vector Control District inspector Eddie Garcia examines mosquito larvae taken from a swimming pool in Buena Park. Orange County has seen a surge in West Nile cases so far this year. (Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times / August 21, 2014)

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  • Anthony Carpio Signature

  • Topics
  • Diseases and Illnesses
  • West Nile Virus
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A Huntington Beach man has died of West Nile virus, one of three area fatalities in two weeks as Orange County's number of human infections has grown more than eightfold in a month, health officials said.

The county Health Care Agency said Tuesday that the total number of reported cases is 76. At the beginning of August, the year's total was nine.

The most recent fatality was a Santa Ana man in his 50s who contracted West Nile neuroinvasive disease, the most severe form of the mosquito-borne illness, the Health Care Agency said.

The unidentified Huntington Beach man, who was in his 70s, had the same form of the disease. His death was reported a week after a Seal Beach woman in her 80s died from the same illness. Underlying medical conditions contributed to her death, officials said.

Two other illnesses have been reported in Huntington Beach and one in Fountain Valley.

But the virus isn't discriminating by age — most of those infected are in their 30s to 50s; three are younger than 18. All but 17 are male.

Eight people have a form of the virus but do not show symptoms, which can include fevers, headaches, body aches, convulsions and muscle weakness, health officials said.

Fifty-one people have the neuroinvasive form, which in some cases leads to neurologic illnesses like meningitis, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Cause of outbreak uncertain

Local officials said they are not sure what's causing the rapid increase in cases, though Jared Dever, director of communications for the Orange County Vector Control District, said the agency anticipated a potential outbreak in June after seeing growth in the number of West Nile-carrying mosquitoes since the beginning of the year.

"We knew that there were going to be some serious problems," said Huntington Beach Councilman Joe Carchio, who is vice president of the Vector Control District. "We were hoping that we had enough ammunition to bring it under control and curtail it as much as we could, but it seems like it's just spiraling out of control now."

West Nile spreads from birds to mosquitoes to people. The Vector Control District provides services aimed at protecting the public from pests including mosquitoes, rodents, flies and ants.

Carchio said he was surprised that a fatality occurred in Huntington Beach, where no human infection had been reported this year until the man's death.

Forty-six of the county's cases are in Santa Ana and Anaheim. The disease also has been reported in Buena Park, Costa Mesa, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Irvine, Laguna Niguel, La Habra, Los Alamitos, Orange and Tustin, according to the Health Care Agency.

Vector Control said last week that it had found 229 dead birds and 296 mosquitoes that tested positive for the disease.

By comparison, the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District this year has reported 12 human infections and 10 dead birds and 141 mosquitoes carrying the illness.

While Orange County Vector Control has tried to slow the breeding of mosquitoes by placing fish in pools and ponds to eat their spawn, residents need to help control the West Nile outbreak, Carchio said.

"Maybe it's because we have a lot of pools that are not being maintained," he said. "You need to have the support of the communities. I think that people don't take it as serious as they should."

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